US energy companies have work to do to make their workplaces look more like the US, finds a report prepared for the National Association of State Energy Officials by BW Research Partnership.

Women comprise 47% of the national labour force, but just 25% of energy workers. Black or African American workers comprise 12% of the national workforce, but just 8% of energy workers. Across all five energy technology sectors surveyed, Black or African American workers’ share of the workforce is 2–5 points lower than the national average. Hispanic or Latinx workers account for 18% of the national labour force but comprise 16% of energy workers.

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Luminalt solar installers on the roof of a home in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

White workers are more likely to work in leadership roles and earn higher starting and overall wages, says the survey. A total of 80% of White energy workers say they are either an executive or supervise employees.

In all, 35% of White survey respondents say they are company executives compared with 17% of Black or African American workers, 19% of Hispanic or Latinx workers and 22% of Asian workers.

Less than half of all workers feel their companies are doing enough to promote diversity and inclusion in hiring, promotion and leadership roles. Just 31–49% of energy workers, across races or ethnic identities, “strongly agreed that their company recruits, hires or equitably promotes an acceptable number of racial and ethnic monitories”. Similar percentages, 36–48%, said “their company’s management and executive leadership is racially and ethnically diverse”.