All articles by Jocelyn Timperley

Jocelyn Timperley is a freelance climate and environment journalist based in Edinburgh. She reports on a wide variety of environment stories from science to policy to adaptation, and also edits at the BBC Future vertical Future Planet. She previously reported on climate policy for Carbon Brief.

Jocelyn Timperley

@jloistf

Floating offshore wind prepares to go commercial

The recent ScotWind offshore wind leasing round heralds a step change for floating offshore wind as a vital renewable technology for energy transition and energy security. Costs are starting to come down but other hurdles remain.

Why wind and solar companies need to address human rights

Allegations of human rights abuses ranging from land grabs to violations of workers’ rights risk slowing the energy transition. Renewable energy supply chains need a human rights policy.

Why Chile’s new constitution can encourage a just energy transition

Chile has masses of renewable energy potential, but its environmental and human rights record around energy projects is far from rosy. A new constitution being drawn up by independent candidates could be the opportunity for change.

Can Latin America’s energy transition weather the pandemic?

With some of the worst death rates from the Covid-19 pandemic, high unemployement and public debt, many Latin American countries are struggling to marry climate action and the need to stop their economies from falling apart.

Will China gamble on a nuclear future?

China plans to reach carbon neutrality by 2060, but how it gets there remains an open question. Nuclear is likely to play a role, but the exact contribution of it, renewables and other energy sources is still unclear.

Why geothermal could be key to clean energy security in the Caribbean

Caribbean islands are increasingly focusing on renewables. Being located on a volcano makes geothermal an interesting option.

Can hydropower be part of a clean energy future?

Massive hydropower projects are frequently criticised for causing more harm than good. What role should they really be playing in the clean energy transition and the future of hydropower?